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Cancer survivor recounts breast reconstruction, will walk for cure this year

Monday, September 26, 2011

According to the National Cancer Institute, fewer than 2 percent of women are diagnosed with breast cancer while under the age of 35. Though rare, breast carcinomas at such an age are quite serious, as Washington, DC, resident Liz Buscema can attest.

In 2009, at age 33, she found out that she had breast cancer. According to WTOP News, she discovered she had the illness just a year after her mother was diagnosed with it.

At the time, Buscema had a 2-year-old son, Jake, who was with her through every step of her treatment, from double mastectomy to breast reconstruction. She told the news source that she did not have to endure chemotherapy or radiation treatments, for which she felt fortunate.

She has since had a daughter, Katie. ""A year after going through my surgeries I did conceive and we're blessed with our little baby girl,"" she happily reported.

Buscema added that she now plans to help others with breast cancer by participating in her local three-day, 60-mile Susan G. Komen for the Cure Walk.

In a lifetime, approximately one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, according to the NCI.

Va. breast cancer survivor to walk 60 miles for a cure. WTOP News Washington, DC. September 4, 2011. http://www.wtop.com/?nid=164&sid=2528341 Accessed September 14, 2011.

SEER Stat Fact Sheets: Breast. National Cancer Institute. http://www.seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/breast.html Accessed September 14, 2011.

Extract: According to the National Cancer Institute, fewer than 2 percent of women are diagnosed with breast cancer while under the age of 35. Though rare, breast carcinomas at such an age are quite serious, as Washington, DC, resident Liz Buscema can attest.

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